PYRETHROID-TREATED JACKETS VERSUS REPELLENT-TREATED JACKETS AND HOODS FOR PERSONAL PROTECTION AGAINST BITING FLIES

Authors
  1. McAndless, J.M.
  2. Lindsay, I.S.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ottawa ONT (CAN)
Abstract
In the report, the concept of using wide-mesh jackets treated with an insecticide rather than a "space" repellent compound for protection against biting flies is examined. The concept, first studied by the USDA Laboratory at Gainesville, Florida, is based on the hypothesis that reduction in the insect population in the vicinity of a jacket through insecticidal action would be sufficient to provide effective personal protection for the wearer. Small field tests were carried out at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa to compare the effectiveness of jackets treated with permethrin insecticide, a rapid insect-knockdown compound, the standard repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (deet), and the experimental repellent tetrahydrofurfuryl octanoate. The ability of repellent-treated wide-mesh hoods to provide facial protection against mosquitoes and blackflies was also investigated.
Report Number
767 —
Date of publication
15 Nov 1977
Number of Pages
22
DSTKIM No
77-04821
CANDIS No
101491
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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