SPACE SICKNESS

Authors
  1. Money, K.E.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN);Canadian Space Agency, Ottawa ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Motion sickness in spaceflight occurred only rarely in the earliest space flights in small capsules, but in the larger Space Shuttle the incidence is fully 70%. Apparently, in larger spacecraft the requirement to make head movements and body movements in weightlessness increases the likelihood of space sickness. Typically, after its appearance in the first day of a spaceflight, space sickness is made worse by head movements and by disorientation, and it is ameliorated by remaining motionless. The sufferer gets better slowly and usually is entirely well after three days. Antimotion sickness drugs have been useful in dealing with space sickness and biofeedback techniques might be helpful, but attempts to predict susceptibility (except by assessing susceptibility on previous spaceflights) have not been successful.
Report Number
AGARD-LS-175-PAP-6A — @Paper presented October 1991 in Canada, Greece and The Netherlands as part of the AGARD sponsored Lecture Series; CONTAINED IN 92-00210
Date of publication
15 Sep 1991
Number of Pages
5
DSTKIM No
92-00208
CANDIS No
103109
Format(s):
Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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