EFFECT OF TEXTILE TEST SAMPLE SIZE ON ASSESSMENT OF PROTECTION TO SKIN FROM THERMAL RADIATION

Authors
  1. Grant, G.A.
  2. Harrison, B.H.
  3. Main, L.A.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ottawa ONT (CAN);Grant (G A) Scientific Consultants Ltd, Nepean ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Test samples of textile materials of 2.5, 7.6, 15.2 or 30.5 cm diameter were exposed to thermal radiation sources at Sandia Central Receiver Test Facility and the DNA Thermal Radiation Source at Kirtland Airforce Base, New Mexico. The materials were exposed to fluences of 5, 10, 15 and 30 cal cm 2(-) in 1 or 3 seconds. The thermal pulse was square or approximately that of 1 KT weapon. Generally, damage to materials increased with an increase in the test sample diameter. High speed photography showed the large diameter samples (30.5 cm) ignited prior to 2.5 cm diameter samples. It was evident that testing with small samples of material would over-estimate the protection afforded. Comparison of test results of materials exposed to simulated and non-simulated nuclear weapons support the conclusion that protection is over-estimated by assessment of damage on exposed small test samples.
Report Number
DREO-1096 —
Date of publication
15 Oct 1991
Number of Pages
23
DSTKIM No
92-00890
CANDIS No
103784
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

Permanent link

Document 1 of 1

Date modified: