TAIWAN AND HONG KONG: STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS FOR CHINA'S FOREIGN RELATIONS AND CHINA'S NATIONAL UNIFICATION

Authors
  1. Bedeski, R.E.
Corporate Authors
Operational Research and Analysis Establishment, Ottawa ONT (CAN) Directorate of Mathematics and Statistics
Abstract
Over the past several years, the People's Republic of China has undergone major changes in domestic and foreign policy. In particular, its policy of reunification with Taiwan has shifted from the use of force to attempts at negotiation. Beijing's leaders have proposed the integration of the island as a special administrative region, and promise to maintain the existing social, economic, and political arrangements. The factors which can reinforce as well as inhibit reunification are examined. Taiwan has played a major role in Beijing's relations with the US. Beijing strongly opposes the sales of American weapons to Taiwan. Reunification with Hong Kong under Chinese sovereignty is expected by 1997. A number of obstacles face negotiations between Britain and China, including the fate of the political and economic freedoms which residents have enjoyed. The PRC has made reunification with Hong Kong (including Kowloon and the New Territories) a priority. TRUNCATED
Report Number
EXTRA-MURALPAP-26 —
Date of publication
15 Sep 1983
Number of Pages
27
DSTKIM No
84-00824
CANDIS No
120314
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

Permanent link

Document 1 of 1

Date modified: