HIGH TEMPERATURE INDUCED ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

Authors
  1. Bhatti, A.R.
  2. Kumar, K.
  3. Stobo, C.
  4. Ingram, J.M.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Suffield, Ralston ALTA (CAN)
Abstract
Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes sensitive to several antibiotics when grown and tested at 46C. Cell wall antibiotics such as penicillin-G and ampicillin are only effective when added to cells grown at 46C prior to a temperature shift to 37C. Antibiotics which must penetrate the cytoplasmic membrane to express their inhibiting action present a pattern different than those which are active against the outer cell wall. In order that these compounds be effective, the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane must be further altered with agents such as EDTA which allows the penetration of actinomycin-D. Inhibitors of protein synthesis, streptomycin and chloramphenicol, have increased access to their sites of action in cells grown at 46C. Cells grown at 46C have 40% less lipopolysaccharide than cells grown at 37C and the lipopolysaccharide aggregates are of large molecular size in cells grown at 46C. TRUNCATED
Report Number
M-1130 —
Date of publication
15 Aug 1984
Number of Pages
26
DSTKIM No
84-03684
CANDIS No
122747
Format(s):
Microfiche filmed at DSIS;Originator's fiche received by DSIS;Hardcopy

Permanent link

Document 1 of 1

Date modified: