REVIEW OF PHARMACOLOGICAL APPROACH TO IMPROVE COLD TOLERANCE

Authors
  1. Vallerand, A.L.
  2. Jacobs, I.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
A pharmacological approach to the problem of enhancing cold tolerance in humans is currently the subject of greater attention. Two approaches are possible. First, drugs that minimize heat loss could delay hypothermia but would also be associated with lower mean skin temperature, the loss of manual dexterity and a greater danger of frostbite. Secondly, agents that increase heat production could increase resistance to cold by producing warmer body temperatures. By using hormones, theophylline, caffeine, amphetamines etc for various periods of time, heat production and cold tolerance have been improved in animal studies. However, a generalization to humans should be made with caution particularly in view of the small animal's capacity for brown fat nonshivering thermogenesis. In humans exposed to comfortable ambient temperatures, recent studies have firmly established that beta adrenergic drugs such as ephedrine, and methylxanthines such as caffeine increase heat production. TRUNCATED
Report Number
DCIEM-92-10-P-119 — @Paper presented at the DCIEM Diver Thermal Protection Workshop, North York, Ontario, Canada, 31 Jan - 2 Feb 1989; CONTAINED IN 92-03143
Date of publication
15 Jan 1992
Number of Pages
5 (p119-123)
DSTKIM No
92-03139
CANDIS No
125609
Format(s):
Microfiche filmed at DSIS;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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