SLEEP DEPRIVATION AND THE EFFECT ON EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

Authors
  1. VanHelder, T.
  2. Radomski, M.W.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN);Toronto Univ, Toronto ONT (CAN) School of Physical and Health Education
Abstract
Even though ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) always increased during exercise in sleep deprived (30-60 hours) subjects compared to normal sleep, this is not a reliable assessment of a subject's ability to perform physical work as the RPEs are dissociated from any cardiovascular changes in sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation of 30 to 72 hours does not affect cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise of varying intensity, or the aerobic and anaerobic performance capability of individuals. Muscle strength and elctro-mechanical responses are also not affected. Time to exhaustion, however, is decreased by sleep deprivation. The major metabolic perturbation of sleep deprivation is the development of pre-diabetic state in humans both at the extra- and intracellular sites, resulting in impaired carbohydrate metabolism. This may explain the reduction in time to exhaustion during exercise in sleep-deprived subjects.
Report Number
DCIEM-88-P-58 — Research Paper; Reprint
Date of publication
01 Jan 1989
Number of Pages
13
Reprinted from
Sports Medicine, vol 7, 1989, p 235-247
DSTKIM No
93-03690
CANDIS No
134241
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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