FUELLING SHIVERING IN HUMANS DURING COLD WATER IMMERSION

Authors
  1. Jacobs, I.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Military cold survival research has traditionally concentrated on ways of conserving body heat. In contrast, this paper will describe our recent investigations of metabolic heat production during cold exposure. In humans increased heat production in the cold is achieved by increased shivering, i.e. involuntary intermittent skeletal muscle contractions, which must be fuelled. Our research has focused on the thermoregulatory effects of manipulating the availability of specific fuel substrates to the shivering musculature. Using procedures such as muscle biopsies to quantify intramuscular substrate utilisation, venous blood sampling to quantify circulating substrates, and continuous monitoring of metabolic rates and rectal temperatures during cold exposure, we have demonstrated the importance of skeletal muscle carbohydates stores for the ability to maintain heat production and delay the onset of hypothermia during cold water immersions.
Report Number
AGARD-CP-540-PAP-6;DCIEM-93-10 — @Conference Paper; CONTAINED IN 94-00956
Date of publication
01 Oct 1993
Number of Pages
3
DSTKIM No
94-00954
CANDIS No
138503
Format(s):
Microfiche filmed at DSIS;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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