EFFECTS OF TRAINING AND ACCLIMATION OF HEAT TOLERANCE IN EXERCISING MEN WEARING PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

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Authors
  1. Aoyagi, Y.
  2. McLellan, T.M.
  3. Shephard, R.J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The study examined the effectiveness of endurance training and heat acclimation in reducing the physiological strain imposed by exercising in the heat while wearing protective clothing. Seven young men underwent 8 weeks of physical training (60-80% maximal aerobic power (VO2max) for 30-45 min-day 1(-), 3-4 days-week 1(-) at <25C) followed by 6 days of heat acclimation (45-55% VO2max for 60 min-day 1(1) at 40C, 30% relative humidity). Nine other young men underwent corresponding periods of control observation and heat acclimation. Before and after each treatment, subjects completed a treadmill walk (4.8 km-h 1(-), 2% grade) in a climatic chamber (40C, 30% relative humidity), wearing in turn normal combat clothing or clothing protecting against nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) agents. We conclude that neither endurance training nor heat acclimation do much to improve exercise tolerance when wearing NBC protective clothing in hot environments, because any added sweat secretion decreases blood volume and increases discomfort without augmenting body cooling.
Report Number
DCIEM-94-08 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Jun 1994
Number of Pages
12
Reprinted from
Eur J Appl Physiol, vol 68, 1994, p 234-245
DSTKIM No
97-00777
CANDIS No
143093
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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