ROLE OF BLOOD AS HEAT SOURCE OR SINK IN HUMAN LIMBS DURING LOCAL COOLING AND HEATING

Authors
  1. Ducharme, M.B.
  2. Tikuisis, P.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to investigate the relative contribution of the convective heat transfer in the forearm and hand to 1) the total heat loss during partial immersion in cold water (water temperature (Tw) = 20C) and 2) the heat gained during partial immersion in warm water (Tw = 38C). The present study shows that, at thermal steady state during partial immersion in water at 20C, the convective heat transfer between the blood and the forearm tissue is the major heat source of the tissue and accounts for 85% of the total heat loss to the environment. For the finger, however, the heat produced by the tissue metabolism and that liberated by the convective heat transfer are equivalent. At thermal steady state during partial immersion in water at 38C, the blood has the role of a heat sink, carrying away from the limb the heat gained from the environment and, to a lesser extent (25%), the metabolic and ocnductive heats. These results suggest that during local cold stress the convective heat transfer by the blood has a greater role than that suggested by previous studies for the forearm but a lesser role for the hand.
Keywords
Arterial occlusion;Water immersion
Report Number
DCIEM-93-28 — Reprint
Date of publication
14 Jan 1993
Number of Pages
9
Reprinted from
J Appl Physiol, vol 76, no 5, 1994, p 2084-2094
DSTKIM No
94-04482
CANDIS No
143599
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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