CONSIDERATIONS FOR OPTIMAL SITING OF RECEIVING ARRAYS OFF CANADA'S WEST COAST FOR ATOC (ACOUSTIC THERMOMETRY OF OCEAN CLIMATE)

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Authors
  1. Scrimger, J.A.
  2. Racca, R.
  3. Schumacher, I.
  4. Henderson, D.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Pacific, Victoria BC (CAN);JASCO Research Ltd, Sidney BC (CAN)
Abstract
There are concerns that due to the measured increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere a global warming, coupled with climate changes, is likely to occur. Warming of the oceans, is possibly the most dire of these changes. It may be possible, with appropiate technology, to measure warming trends in the world's oceans by transmitting sound pulses across ocean basins and measuring their travel times, since sound travels faster in warm water than in cold. The Heard Island Feasibility Test (HIFT) was carried out in 1991 when sound pulses were transmitted around the world from a transducer suspended below a ship, the RV Cory Chouest stationed to the north of Heard Island in the southern Indian Ocean. Canada recorded these transmissions on towed arrays deployed off the east and west coasts of N. America by CFAV Quest and CNAV Endeavour. Resulting from an unsolicited proposal, JASCO Research Ltd. was contracted to analyses the recorded data. The subsequent phase to HIFT was the project ATOC (Acoustic Thermometry for Ocean Climate) which called for the transmission of sound pulses across the N. Pacific Ocean basin from a transmitter near the Island of Kauai to a receiver near Pt. Sur, N. California. As part of the contract it was decided to be worthwhile to consider the implications of installing a second receiver off the west coast of Canada. TRUNCATED.
Keywords
Global warming;Heard Island Feasibility Test;ATOC (Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate)
Report Number
DREP-CR-94-63 — Contractor Report
Date of publication
01 Apr 1994
Number of Pages
80
DSTKIM No
94-07469
CANDIS No
145132
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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