EFFECTS OF THEOPHYLLINE INGESTION ON THERMOREGULATION DURING 15C WATER IMMERSION

PDF

Authors
  1. Jacobs, I.
  2. Wang, L.C.H.
  3. Romet, T.
  4. Kavanagh, M.
  5. Frim, J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Military personnel can be exposed to emergency survival conditions in cold environments which could result in lethal levels of hypothermia if appropriate insulation or protective shelters are not available. Hypothermia can be delayed in humans if metabolic heat product is increased, and we have previously demonstrated that pre-treatment with certain safe pharmacological agents can elicit such an effect. Others have reported that the ingestion of theophylline, a caffeine-like compound, delays the onset of hypothermia during acute cold air exposure. The rpesent study was carried out to determine if theophylline treatment will delay the onset of hypothermia during a more severe cold stress, i.e. cold water immersion. Eight male subjects were immersed in 15 deg C water on several different days after treatment with placebo, theophylline, or either of these combined with a standard meal. Although there were indications that the theophylline treatment, particularly when combined with the meal, increased metabolic heat production prior to immersion, there were no significant differences between trials in metabolic heat production during the water immersion. Rectal temperature decreased similarly in all trials at a rate ranging between 0.4 to 3.0 deg C/h. Thus, the beneficial effects of theophylline treatment that were previously reported for cold air exposure may not be applicable to cold water immersion.
Keywords
Water immersion;Theophylline;Methyl-xanthine
Report Number
DCIEM-94-46 — Research Report
Date of publication
01 Sep 1994
Number of Pages
23
DSTKIM No
94-07055
CANDIS No
147573
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

Permanent link

Document 1 of 1

Date modified: