EFFECTS OF 6 VERSUS 12 DAYS OF HEAT ACCLIMATION ON HEAT TOLERANCE IN LIGHTLY EXERCISING MEN WEARING PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

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Authors
  1. Aoyagi, Y.
  2. McLellan, T.M.
  3. Shephard, R.J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The study investigated the influence of 6 versus 12 days of heat acclimation on the tolerance of low-intensity exercise in the heat while wearing protective clothing. Sixteen young men were acclimated by treadmill walking (50% of each subject's maximal aerobic power for 60 min day 1(-)) in a climatic chamber (40C dry bulb (db), 30% relative humidity) for either 6 consecutive days or two 6-day periods, separated by a 1-day rest. Before and after heat acclimation, the subjects performed a heat-exercise test (1.34 m.s 1(-), 0% grade; 40C db, 30% relative humidity), either under control conditions (wearing normal light combat clothing (continuous exercise; n = 5)) or when wearing protective clothing resistant against nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) agents (repeated bouts of 15-mm walk + 15-mm rest; n = 8).
Keywords
Sweat evaporation;Environmental physiology;Skin temperature;Rectal temperature
Report Number
DCIEM-94-07 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Jan 1994
Number of Pages
10
Reprinted from
Eur J Appl Physiol, vol 71, 1995, p 187-196
DSTKIM No
96-01146
CANDIS No
155562
Format(s):
Document Image stored on Optical Disk;Hardcopy

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