DETERMINATION OF BODY HEAT STORAGE IN CLOTHING: CALORIMETRY VERSUS THERMOMETRY

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Authors
  1. Aoyagi, Y.
  2. McLellan, T.M.
  3. Shephard, R.J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Two methods of estimating body heat storage were compared under differing conditions of clothing, training, and acclimation to heat. Six male subjects underwent 8 weeks of physical training (60-80% of maximal aerobic power (VO2 max) for 30-45 min-day 1(-), 3-4 days - week 1 (-) at <25C dry bulb (db)) followed by 6 consecutive days of heat acclimation (45-55% VO2 max for 60 min-day 1 (-) at 40C db, 30% relative humidity). Nine other male subjects underwent corresponding periods of control observation followed by heat acclimation. Before and after each treatment, subjects walked continuously on a treadmill (1.34 m.s 1(-), 2% grade) in a climatic chamber (40C db, 30% relative humidity) for an average of 118 min (range 92-120 min) when wearing normal light combat clothing and for an average of 50 min (range 32-68 min) when wearing protective clothing.
Keywords
Mean body temperature;Mean skin temperature;Rectal temperature;Calorimetry;Thermometry
Report Number
DCIEM-94-06 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Jan 1994
Number of Pages
10
Reprinted from
Eur J Appl Physiol, vol 71, 1995, p 197-206
DSTKIM No
96-01215
CANDIS No
155563
Format(s):
Document Image stored on Optical Disk;Hardcopy

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