INCREASING SEVERITY OF ICE CONDITIONS IN BAFFIN BAY AND DAVIS STRAIT AND ITS EFFECT ON THE EXTREME LIMITS OF ICE

Authors
  1. Dunbar, M.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ottawa ONT (CAN)
Abstract
It is now well established that the warming trend that characterized the climate of the Northern Hemisphere in the 1920s and 1930s came to an end in the 1940s, and that since then mean air temperatures have been falling. It is reason- able to expect that ice conditions should reflect the same trend, though possibly with some time lag owing to the slower warming and cooling of the sea surface, and that the change might first become noticeable in the boundary areas of the ice-covered waters, where the balance between ice and no ice might be expected to be most sensitive. The present paper attempts to document the same trend in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait, using air reconnaissance data for the 1950s and 1960s, which are the only decades for which such data are available.
Report Number
676 —
Date of publication
01 Jan 1975
Number of Pages
9
Reprinted from
Sea Ice Conference Proceedings, Reykjavik, 1972, p 87-93
DSTKIM No
73-05181
CANDIS No
19992
Format(s):
Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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