THE ROLE OF THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM DURING EXPOSURE TO ALTITUDE IN RATS

Authors
  1. Myles, W.S.
  2. Ducker, A.J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The role of increased output of noradrenaline (NA) was investigated during acute and chronic exposure of rats to simulated altitudes of 5,500 m, 7,300 m and 10,200 m. The NA response to altitude was inhibited by daily injection of guanethidine sulphate and the effectiveness of this treatment was confirmed by decreased excretion of free NA in the urine. Body weight changes during chronic exposure to 5,500 m and 7,300 m were similar in guanethidine treated animals and controls and there was no compensatory increase in the excretion of 11-hydroxycorticosteroids or adrenaline due to the drug. When animals were exposed acutely to 10,200 m, or were subjected to the added stress of partial restraint at 7,300 m, guanethidine treatment caused a drastic increase in mortality.
Report Number
RP-822 — Research Paper
Date of publication
01 Jan 1973
Number of Pages
8
Reprinted from
Int. J Biometeor., vol 17, no 1, 1973, p51-58
DSTKIM No
74-02259
CANDIS No
22231
Format(s):
Hardcopy

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