ARGUMENTS FOR THE GREATER IMPORTANCE OF THE PRODROMAL SYNDROME THAN INCAPACITATION (INCLUDING EARLY TRANSIENT INCAPACITATION) IN THE CONSIDERATION OF RADIATION EFFECTS

Authors
  1. Cairnie, A.B.
  2. Robitaille, H.A.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ottawa ONT (CAN)
Abstract
A review of the world literature on incapacitating effects of radiation leads to the conclusion in this report that of the six men who received in accidents radiation doses greater than 1,000 rad, only one showed an effect on performance which resembles the Early Transient Incapacitation or Immediate Permanent Incapacitation seen in experimental studies with subhuman primates. On the other hand, a previous DREO Report has found that nausea and vomiting (prodromal syndrome) will be experienced by most subjects receiving 100 rad or more. It is argued that in modern warfare the prodromal syndrome will cause a serious decrement in performance. In a final section it is proposed that the prodromal effects could be simulated with lithium carbonate, if necessary, to convince operators and strategists that even low doses of radiation (> 100 rad) will seriously interfere with performance of survivors during the first 24 or 48 hours after a nuclear strike.
Report Number
836 —
Date of publication
15 Dec 1980
Number of Pages
25
DSTKIM No
81-02975
CANDIS No
33851
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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