VIGILANCE LATENCIES TO AIRCRAFT DETECTION AMONG NORAD SURVEILLANCE OPERATORS

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Authors
  1. Pigeau, R.A.
  2. Angus, R.G.
  3. O'Neill, P.
  4. Mack, I.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
A function of North American Aerospace Defence (NORAD) in North Bay Ontario is to identify all aircraft entering Canadian air space. The first step in performing this task is to detect visually the presence of aircraft from either radar or tarnsponder information presented on display consoles. This challenging, real-world vigilance task was used in two experiments to investigate factors affecting detection latencies. Taken as a whole, the experiments revealed that: 1) transponder tracks, with their unique symbology, were more easily detected than radar tracks; 2) performance varied as a function of geographic area of coverage; 3) the midnight shift was particularly sensitive to vigilance decrements; and 4) a vigilance decrement' effect can occur in a real world task, but this effect is not as strong as those reported in laboratory studies.
Keywords
Chronopsychology;Vigilance decrement effect
Report Number
DCIEM-93-21 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Sep 1995
Number of Pages
13
Reprinted from
Human Factors, vol 37, no 3, 1995, p 622-634
DSTKIM No
96-02026
CANDIS No
389684
Format(s):
Document Image stored on Optical Disk;Hardcopy

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