EFFECTS OF SLEEP LOSS ON SUSTAINED COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE DURING A COMMAND AND CONTROL SIMULATION

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Authors
  1. Angus, R.G.
  2. Heslegrave, R.J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Because of low cognitive demands and infrequent performance assessment, previous sleep-loss studies may have provided conservative estimates of the cognitive deficits that can occur during sustained, intensive, military operations. The research described here addresses the limitations of earlier studies by requiring and measuring performance on a continuous basis in a computerized laboratory environment. During a 54-h period of wakefulness, subjects were required to continuously monitor and act upon information being transmitted over a communication network while their performance on cognitive tests, which were embedded in and distributed around the message traffic, was continuously evaluated. The results show that this cognitively demanding environment produces greater mood and performance decrements as a function of sleep loss than previous, less-demanding studies. The methodology is described in detail, and the implications of the experimental findings are discussed.
Report Number
85-P-13 — Research Paper
Date of publication
01 Jan 1985
Number of Pages
13
Reprinted from
Behavior Research Methods, Instruments & Computers, vol 17, no 1, 1985, p 55-67
DSTKIM No
85-02941
CANDIS No
47733
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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