THE ENERGY COST OF COMBAT ENGINEER TASKS

Authors
  1. Myles, W.S.
  2. Romet, T.T.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Canadian combat engineers performed abatis (blocking a road by felling trees), minelaying and road cratering for 8 hours each day on four consecutive days. Energy expenditure was estimated from heart rate continuously recorded using the VITALOG personal monitoring system (PMS-8). The average heart rates were below 120 bpm for all three combat engineer tasks indicating that, for these subjects, energy expenditure did not exceed 35-40% of their VO2max. Since abatis, minelaying and cratering are considered to be the most physically demanding tasks performed by combat engineers, it seems safe to conclude that the average energy expenditure for sustained operations will be at, or below, this level. This experiment also provided an opportunity to evaluate the PMS-8 as a means of collecting physiological data in a non-intrusive manner during military maneuvers. TRUNCATED
Report Number
85-R-31 —
Date of publication
15 Aug 1985
Number of Pages
19
DSTKIM No
85-03729
CANDIS No
48488
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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