TREATMENT OF LPS-INDUCED TISSUE INJURY: ROLE OF LIPOSOMAL ANTIOXIDANTS

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Authors
  1. Suntres, Z.E.
  2. Shek, P.N.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Tissue injury is a common occurrence in muiltiple organ failure, a possible clinical complication of Gram-negative bacterial sepsis. Gram-negative bacteria, in part through lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and other cytokines, activate neutrophils to increase oxygen consumption and produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS has been suggested to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the susceptibility of tissues to ROS can be reduced by augmenting the antioxidant status of the affected tissues. Rats were challenged intravenously with LPS (Escherichia coli: 0111:B4) at a dose of 1 mg/kg body weight, and 0, 2, 4, or 6 h later were treated intravenously with plain liposomes or alpha-tocopherol liposomes (20 mg alpha-tocopherol/kg body weight); treated rates were then killed 24 h after LPS challenge. Animals challenged with LPS were extensively damaged in the liver, as evidenced by an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, and also in the lung, as indicated by a decrease in pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme and alkaline phosphatase activities. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Drug delivery
Report Number
DCIEM-96-P-23 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Feb 1996
Number of Pages
8
Reprinted from
Shock, vol 6, 1996, p S57-S64
DSTKIM No
96-02534
CANDIS No
499185
Format(s):
Document Image stored on Optical Disk;Hardcopy

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