RESIDUAL ANALYSIS IN THE DETERMINATION OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE ESTIMATES OF BODY HEAT STORAGE IN CLOTHED SUBJECTS

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Authors
  1. Aoyagi, Y.
  2. McLellan, T.M.
  3. Shephard, R.J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Body heat storage can be estimated by calorimetry (from the heat gains and losses) or by thermometry (from changes (W) in mean body temperature (Tb) calculated as a weighted combination of rectal (Tre) and mean skin temperatures (Tsk). If an invariant weighting factor of Tre and Tsk were to be used (for instance, WTb = 0.8.WTre + 0.2 WTsk under hot conditions), body heat storage could be over- or underestimated substantially relative to calorimetry, depending on whether the subject was wearing light or protective clothing. This study investigated whether discrepancies between calorimetry and thermometry arise from methodological errors in the calorimetric estimate of heat storage, from inappropriate weightings in the thermometric estimate, or from both. Residuals of calorimetry versus thermometric estimates were plotted against individual variables in the standard heat balance equation, applying various weighting factors to Treand Tsk. Whether light or protective clothing was worn, the calorimetric approach generally gave appropriate estimates of heat exchange components and thus heat storage. One exception was in estimating latent heat loss from sweat evaporation. If sweat evaporation exceeded 650 g.h 1(-) when wearing normal clothing, evaporative heat loss was overestimated and thus body heat storage was underestimated. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Mean body temperature;mean skin temperature;rectal temperature;Calorimetry;thermometry;Sweating
Report Number
DCIEM-RP-95-02 — Reprint
Date of publication
05 Sep 1995
Number of Pages
12
Reprinted from
J Appl Physiol, vol 73, 1996, p 287-298
DSTKIM No
96-02546
CANDIS No
499279
Format(s):
Document Image stored on Optical Disk;Hardcopy

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