PSEUDO-CORIOLIS EFFECTS IN SCREENING FOR SIMULATOR SICKNESS

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Authors
  1. Johnson, W.H.
  2. Sunahara, F.A.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN);St Michael's Hospital, Toronto ONT (CAN) Dept of Otolaryngology;Toronto Univ, Toronto ONT (CAN) Dept of Pharmacology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to expose the non-auditory labyrinth of the inner ear to a moving visual field with and without concomitant nodding head movements to assess visually induced nausea and self-vection in subjects. Subjects tested were, 15 normals, 18 unilateral labyrinthectomies and 6 bilateral labyrinthectomies. The findings show a higher incidence of visually induced nausea in normal subjects compared to unilateral (44%) and bilateral (33%) labyrinthectomized subjects. When the subjects were exposed to the moving visual field only (no head movement), pronounced self-vection occurred in all subjects but with earlier onset in the bilateral labyrinthine defective subjects as compared to normal and unilateral defective subjects. Moreover, self-vection was more rapid in onset and stronger in intensity when the visual effects were uncomplicated by labyrinthine influence of the inner ear. In a second part of the study the relative effectiveness of color and visual area on self-vection were investigated. The relative provocativeness of color and area, were measured by determining the times required to induce the start and continuation of self-vection to the stimuli. Seventeen (17) normal healthy adults were exposed to five different colors (white, blue, yellow and red) and four different areas of visual field for a total of 306 tests. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Inner ear
Report Number
DCIEM-96-CR-05 — Contractor Report (Final)
Date of publication
01 Jun 1996
Number of Pages
23
DSTKIM No
96-02930
CANDIS No
499427
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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