INSTRUMENT FLYING PERFORMANCE AFTER G-INDUCED LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS

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Authors
  1. Paul, M.A.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
While both the USAF and the USN have characterized the immediate sequelae of G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) as resulting in approximately 24 s of incapacitation, very little is known about the effect of a G-LOC immediately after this incapacitation period. This study is an attempt to determine the effect of G-LOC on instrument flying performance immediately after G-LOC. In order to establish their flying performance baselines, 29 Canadian Forces (CF) pilots attending the high sustained G (HSG) course flew 3 iterations of a 15-min instrument flying task on the day prior to their HSG course. All 29 pilots performed this same task the next day within 5 min of completing the centrifuge training. In addition, the pilots who experienced G-LOC flew the task again 45 min after G-LOC. Flying performance was assessed by calculating Root Mean Square (RMS) error on 11 flight parameters. These RMS values were submitted to a multivariate analysis of variance. Of the 29 pilots, 12 experienced G-LOC during the centrifuge training the flying performance of the 17 non-G-LOC pilots was not affected by their exposure to HSG. Of the 12 G-LOC pilots, 11 had no measurable performance decrement while 1 pilot, after a severe G-LOC, stalled and "spun-in" on take-off and then (after being re-established on the outbound radial) could not complete the task. This same pilot flew the task very well 45 min later. TRUNCATED
Keywords
G-LOC;G-induced loss of consciousness
Report Number
DCIEM-96-P-52 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Nov 1996
Number of Pages
6
Reprinted from
Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, vol 67, no 11, 1996, p 1028-1033
DSTKIM No
97-00003
CANDIS No
500326
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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