THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION CAPABILITY TESTS

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Authors
  1. Abel, S.M.
Corporate Authors
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto ONT (CAN) Samuel Lunenfeld Research Inst;Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
An experiment was undertaken to determine the effect of a mild bilateral sensori-neural hearing loss on speech perception in noise in subjects with communications experience. Two groups with normal hearing (N = 15) and hearing loss (N = 9), recruited from among Canadian Forces personnel, were compared with respect to the following measures: detection thresholds at 2000 Hz and 4000 Hz in quiet and in a background of 90 dB SPL-helicopter noise, frequency selectivity in the region of 2000 Hz, consonant discrimination in quiet and in speech spectrum noise (S/N - -4, +8 dB) and word recognition in multi-talker babble noise (S/N = 0, +5 dB). Perceived communication handicap was assessed by means of two questionnaires, the first developed especially for this project to document communications experience, and the second, a standard profile for routine audiometric assessments. Relative to normal, the impaired group had significantly higher detection thresholds at 4000 Hz but not at 2000 Hz, and there was no difference between the groups in frequency selectivity at 2000 Hz. Low-frequency helicopter noise did not affect detection of 4000 Hz in the hearing-impaired group, although it raised the threshold significantly in the normal group. Mild hearing loss was also not an impediment to consonant discrimination in quiet. TRUNCATED
Date of publication
01 Mar 1993
Number of Pages
39
DSTKIM No
97-00607
CANDIS No
500895
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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