THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATIONS OF THE IR TECHNOLOGY FOR THE DETECTION OF LOW-METAL AND NONMETALLIC BURIED LANDMINES

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Authors
  1. Simard, J-R.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, Valcartier QUE (CAN)
Abstract
One of the greatest threats during peacekeeping operations is buried low-metal mines on roads. The Canadian Department of National Defence (DND), as many other equivalent organizations around the world, initiated important efforts to develop a multisensor teleoperated mine detection vehicle under the Improved Landmine Detection Capability (ILDC) to solve this problem. One of the sensors evaluated for this project is the IR imaging technology. This document reports the results of many trials performed during the last 1 « year and models developed form these results to characterize the capabilities of this technology. The fundamental variables dictating the formation of the buried mine IR signature are identified and a monitoring technique predicting the optimum performance of the technology is proposed. From especially designed trials to simulate the scenarios addressed by the ILDC project, the detection efficiencies and the false alarm rates on packed gravel and sand roads at different times of day are measured. From these results, it is observed that the best performance is obtained at night and on packed gravel road. In addition, the performance of the technology in winterlike weather, on shady roads, and for many other external conditions of interest for the ILDC project are investigated.
Keywords
Long wavelengths;Middle wave infrared;Improved Landmine Detection Project;Low metal mines;Nonmetallic mines
Report Number
DREV-9615 —
Date of publication
01 Mar 1997
Number of Pages
115
DSTKIM No
97-02054
CANDIS No
502142
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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