RISK ASSESSMENT OF BACTERIOLOGIC HEALTH HAZARDS IN THE HELMET BLADDER COMPONENT OF A PRESSURE BREATHING FOR G (PBG) SYSTEM

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Authors
  1. Severs, Y.D.
  2. Sabiston, B.H.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
One of the components of the experimental development G protection ensemble known as STING (Sustained Tolerance to INcreased G) is a breathing loop consisting of a pressurized oxygen supply, regulator, face mask, and an inflatable helmet bladder. The bladder, located in the back of the pilot's helmet at the occipital level of the skull, inflates during the positive pressure breathing phase of the Pressure Breathing for G (PBG) cycle. The bladder is inflated to the same pressure as the mask, thus pulling the mask tighter to the face; preventing mask leakage; and, ensuring an adequate supply of pressurized oxygen to the user. Upon cessation of PBG, the helmet bladder deflates. The helmet bladder is effectively a 'blind sac' in an otherwise open system. This fact has prompted the Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment (AETE) to express concern over the possibility that the bladder could serve as a reservoir for microbiological contaminants (bacterial or fungal). If such contaminants were present, deflation of the bladder, upon cessation of PBG, may result in contamination of the breathed oxygen. If so, this would pose a health hazard to the individual. This study was carried out to examine the possibility that the helmet bladder could serve as a reservoir of contaminants and that, if present, such contaminants could be spread throughout the breathing loop. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Helmet bladder;Sustained Tolerance to INcreased G (STING);Bacterial contamination;Pressure Breathing for G (PBG)
Report Number
DCIEM-97-TM-28 — Technical Memorandum
Date of publication
01 May 1997
Number of Pages
12
DSTKIM No
97-03940
CANDIS No
504216
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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