MODAFINIL, AMPHETAMINE AND PLACEBO AS ALERTING SUBSTANCES FOR SUSTAINED OPERATIONS

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Authors
  1. Pigeau, R.
  2. McCann, C.
  3. Baranksi, J.
  4. Thompson, M.
  5. Taylor, M.
  6. and others
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Fatigue due to sleep loss is a significant operational concern among all military forces. Neville et. al. (1994), for example, reported that airlift operations carried out by C-141 aircrews during Operation Desert Storm were so fatiguing that crews at times felt that they were unable to function. Soldiers, particularly the commander and the maintenance personnel of a U.S. National Guard attack helicopter battalion, accrued a significant sleep debt during an annual training exercise because the sleep they received was often fragmented and intermittent (Caldwell et. al. 1992). During an intensive 9 day Somolia re-deployment operation where numerous time zones were crossed and long working hours were logged, a Canadian CC-130 crew slept on the average only 4 hours each 24 h period (Pigeau, unpublished data). Similarly, a battery of gunners during a division level field exercise (RV'81) managed only 14-16 hours of sleep over a four day period (Angus et. al. 1992). Of course fatigue due to sleep loss is not unique to the military environment. In a report for the National Commission of Sleep Disorders Research, Leger (1994) estimated that the total cost of civilian accidents related to sleepiness in 1988 was over $43 billion and concluded that sleepiness, both as a primary and as a secondary cause, is very underrated factor. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Modafinil;Sustained operations
Report Number
DCIEM-95-P-39 — Paper
Date of publication
01 Oct 1995
Number of Pages
6
DSTKIM No
98-00093
CANDIS No
506690
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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