EVIDENCE FOR A MODAFINIL INDUCED "OVERCONFIDENCE" EFFECT DURING SUSTAINED OPERATIONS

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Authors
  1. Baranski, J.V.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
"Self-monitoring" refers to the ability to assess accurately one's own performance in a specific environment. The present paper explored the effects of the alerting substances Modafinil and Amphetamine on the ability to self-monitoring cognitive performance during 64 hours of sleep deprivation (SD) and continuous cognitive work. Two tasks were examined for self-monitoring ability: A visual (perceptual) comparison task and a complex mental addition task. Immediately before (and after) each session, subjects were required to estimate the proportion of trials that they thought they would answer (had answered) correctly. The experiment involved three drug conditions: Modafinil (300 mg, N=14), Amphetamine (20 mg, N=12), and Placebo (N=13), which were administered three times: (1) at 2330 prior to the first night of SD, (2) at 0530 of the second night of SD, and (3) at 1530 of the third day of SD. The placebo condition displayed substantial performance deficits (i.e., poorer response accuracy) during the first and second nights of SD. Concomitantly, however, the self-monitoring ability of the placebo conditions was remarkably accurate throughout the study. The effect of the stimulants was to effectively maintain task performance through the first night of SD and to recuperate performance during the second night of SD. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Modafinil;Sustained operations
Report Number
DCIEM-95-P-41 — Paper from the Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the IMTA
Date of publication
01 Oct 1995
Number of Pages
9
DSTKIM No
98-00038
CANDIS No
506692
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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