THE EFFECT OF ALERTING DRUGS ON PLANNING PERFORMANCE DURING SUSTAINED OPERATIONS

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Authors
  1. McCann, C.
  2. Pointing, T.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Planning is a fundamental and critical activity in the accomplishment of military missions. Sometimes planning can be carried out well in advance of an operation; at other times it is subject to extreme time pressure - the need to "plan on the fly". Like other activities in the military, planning during an operation can be required at any time around the clock, and for intensive periods. In fact, it is acknowledged that a good Commander is always planning. Thus it is of concern to determine whether and how sleep deprivation (SD) affects planning and whether alerting substances can succesfully ameliorate any deterioration in planning performance. The experiment described here addresses these issues and, in particular, investigates how two alerting drugs, amphetamine and modafinil, affect planning. This study was carried out in the context of a larger expeirment addressing the effects of amphetamine and modafinl during 64 hours of sleep deprivation as described in Pigeau et al. (1995) in these proceedings. Military planning, of the type carried out in command and control, is primarily a cognitive activity by which the resources and constraints associated with an aim or mission are analysed to create a set of temporally-ordered actions to be carried out in the future (McCann &Essens, 1991). TRUNCATED
Keywords
Modafinil;Sustained operations
Report Number
DCIEM-95-P-42 — Paper from the Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the IMTA
Date of publication
01 Oct 1995
Number of Pages
10
DSTKIM No
98-00039
CANDIS No
506693
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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