MEASUREMENT OF HEARING PROTECTOR ATTENUATION AT ULTRASONIC FREQUENCIES

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Authors
  1. Behar, A.
  2. Crabtree, R.B.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Health hazards resulting from exposure to ultrasound such as nausea, vertigo and fatigue (collectively called ultrasound sickness) have been recognized for many years, both in situations where the energy is transmitted directly to human tissue and by means of air transmission. The recognition of these hazards is reflected in the existence of several standards and regulations issued by government and health agencies in various countries. Some of these set limits for exposure to air-transmitted ultrasound intended to minimize the risk of sustaining ultrasound sickness (1,2). In contrast to the usual rating procedure for sound exposure which involves A-weighted sound levels, these usually specify acceptable at-ear levels in high-frequency one-third octave bands, typically over the range of 12.5 to 20 kHz.
Report Number
DCIEM-97-P-13 — Paper
Date of publication
01 Jun 1997
Number of Pages
6
DSTKIM No
98-00082
CANDIS No
506700
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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