DESIGNING WITH GLASS REINFORCED ENGINEERING THERMOPLASTICS

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Authors
  1. Bates, P.J.
  2. Bui, V.T.
Corporate Authors
Royal Military Coll of Canada, Kingston ONT (CAN) Dept of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering;Defence Research Establishment Atlantic, Dartmouth NS (CAN)
Abstract
Glass reinforced thermoplastic materials are used in a wide variety of civilian and military applications. They are often chosen over metals and glass reinforced thermosetting materials for reasons of lower cost combined with equal or superior part performance. The higher production rates and part function integration capability associated with injection moulding, allow these thermoplastic based compounds to deliver a lower part cost than other often less expensive metallic or thermosetting materials. Prior to profiting from these cost advantages, the designer of glass reinforced injection moulded parts must first confront a number of issues: orientation of the glass fibre reinforcement causing anisotropy of all material properties, weldlines leading to areas of low mechanical strength, temperature limitations of engineering thermoplastics, as well as high equipment costs due to the high pressures required to manufacture large parts. Recently, a number of new glass reinforced engineering thermoplastic materials have been developed to address some of these problems. Semi-aromatic polyamides, long fibre reinforced compounds, and glass mat reinforced thermoplastic are several examples.
Report Number
DREA-SR-97-002-PAP-7 — CONTAINED IN 98-00986
Date of publication
01 Oct 1997
Number of Pages
16
DSTKIM No
98-00993
CANDIS No
507210
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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