VIBRATION ISOLATION RESEARCH FOR NAVAL SHIPS AT THE AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE FORCE ACADEMY

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Authors
  1. Williamson, H.
Corporate Authors
Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra (Australia) School of Aerospace Mechanical Engineering;Defence Research Establishment Atlantic, Dartmouth NS (CAN)
Abstract
To avoid detection in times of conflict, it is vitally important for naval ships to be designed so that acoustic signatures are minimised. The primary source of a ship's acoustic signature is on-board machinery. In order to reduce the acoustic signature, the transmission of structure-borne noise from machinery should be minimised. The minimisation of this transmission depends upon careful design of machinery isolators and supporting structures. This paper will discuss research work in this area at the Australian Defence Force Academy which has been sponsored by Australia's Defence Science and Technology Organization. Part of the work concentrates on the measurement and characterisation of the performance of polymeric vibration isolators. Another aspect of the research concerns the characterisation and optimisation of machinery supporting structures for minimum transfer of vibrational energy to the ship's structure. Contact between an isolator and supporting structure occurs over a finite contact area. Hence the true structural response is ot well represented by the response due to a concentrated force, ie, point mobility. Research is proceeding on the concept of surface mobility, that is the response of supporting structures to forces distributed over a finite area. TRUNCATED
Report Number
DREA-SR-97-002-PAP-34 — CONTAINED IN 98-00986
Date of publication
01 Oct 1997
Number of Pages
13
DSTKIM No
98-01020
CANDIS No
507237
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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