USE OF AN AUTOMATIC TRACKER AS A FUNCTION OF ITS RELIABILITY

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Authors
  1. McFadden, S.M.
  2. Giesbrecht, B.L.
  3. Gula, C.A.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The present paper reports two studies investigating the use and usefulness of an automated tracker as a function of its reliability. The participants' task was to update the position of several targets when new information was received about the current position of existing targets, new targets, and noise signals. They could update the position of each target manually or they could assign one or more targets to an automatic tracker (AT), which used the same information available to the participant to update the position of the targets it was responsible for. In the first study, the reliability of the AT was varied from totally unreliable to very reliable. Participants' use of the AT and system performance increased as the reliability of the AT increased. However, actual use of the tracker was not a simple function of its reliability. Instead, use appeared to be a function of both AT reliability and the participants' ability to do the task manually. The second study examined system performance and use of an AT as a function of task difficulty (number of targets that had to be tracked) and initial reliability of the AT (high versus moderate reliability). When the task was more difficult, most partipants continuously assigned targets to the AT independent of its reliability. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Human performance;Man machine interface;Automated controllers;Automated detection;Automated tracking;Target tracking;Trust;Faith
Report Number
DCIEM-98-P-58 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Apr 1998
Number of Pages
25
Reprinted from
Ergonomics, vol 41, no 4, 1998, p 512-536
DSTKIM No
98-01435
CANDIS No
508231
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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