INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN DECISION MAKING: ESTABLISHING COGNITIVE STYLE NORMATIVE VALUES FOR A MILITARY SAMPLE

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Authors
  1. Thompson, M.M.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Cognitive styles are differences that document individuals' perferred information gathering and decision making styles. In the present research, a large-scale survey study was conducted to establish normative values of cognitive style variables for a military sample. Establishing the comparable nature of these samples is necessary for extrapolating to a military population the existing body of research using university samples. The military sample included 355 Canadian Forces personnel (276 males and 48 females - 31 individuals did not list their gender). All branches of the CF (12) air, 191 land, 18 sea, 25 respondents did not report their uniform) were represented. The sample also included 61 commissioned officers, 18 officer cadets, and 276 individuals from the noncommissioned ranks. Military participants completed a variety of cognitive style measures during several mass testing sessions. These values were then compared to existing norms established for university samples in prior research. Results of the descriptive and reliability analyses indicated that the cognitive styles of the military samples generally corespond with those obtained from university samples. ANOVAS and multiple comparison tests indicated that, overall, the officer sample was more similar to the university sample than was the sample drawn from the noncommissioned ranks. Potential reasons for differences found are noted. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Individual differences;Cognitive styles;Normative values;Military vs Civilian Student Norms
Report Number
DCIEM-98-R-62 — Technical Memorandum
Date of publication
01 Oct 1998
Number of Pages
53
DSTKIM No
98-02746
CANDIS No
509693
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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