A MODEL OF EVAPORATION FROM THE SKIN WHILE WEARING PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

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Authors
  1. Cain, B.
  2. McLellan, T.M.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
A simple model was developed to describe the transport of water vapour from subjects working in hot environments while wearing chemical-protective clothing. The goal of the modelling was to obtain a better estimate of evaporative cooling of the subjects, as it was hypothesised that calculations of evaporative heat loss based on changes in dressed weight over-estimate the actual benefit experienced by the subjects. The model employed measured values of vapour pressure within the clothing ensemble to estimate the skin vapour pressure. The resistance of the clothing ensemble to water vapour transport was calculated from measurements of the physical properties of the materials in conjunction with estimates of the resistance of air layers between the clothing layers. The model predicts mean evaporation rates form the skin that are approximately 60% of those calculated from measured changes in dressed weight. Error analysis failed to account for the magnitude of this difference and possible explanations for the difference are advanced. A brief examination of the effect of wicking suggests that some of the difference results from a reduction of the resistance of the garment to water vapour due to wicking of liquid sweat through fabric layters.
Keywords
Heat strain;Water vapour transport;Human performance
Report Number
DCIEM-97-P-19 — Reprint
Date of publication
01 Nov 1997
Number of Pages
13
Reprinted from
Int J Biometeorol, vol, 41, 1998, p 183-193
DSTKIM No
99-00089
CANDIS No
510015
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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