A METHOD FOR TRACKING AND REMOVING MOTION ARTIFACTS IN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING SYSTEMS

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Authors
  1. Dhanantwari, A.C.
  2. Stergiopoulos, S.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN);University of Western Ontario, London ONT (CAN) Dept of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Abstract
Computed Tomography in medical applications is an imaging modality that reproduces transverse cross sections or "slices" of the human body. The patient is placed in between an x-ray source and an array of sensors, this last measuring the amount of radiation that passes through the body. During the data acquisition, source and detectors move around the patient, 360 degrees, resulting in a large number of X-ray projections. Finally, from this et of data and by applying image reconstruction techniques an image of the body's cross-section of interest is reconstructed. This process requires stationarity, which is always being violated by organ motion during the relatively long data acquisition process, which usually takes about one second. This affects seriously the quality of the final reconstructed image, which presents blurring effects, the so-called motion artifacts, that may prevent reliable diagnosis. The intuitive solution to this approach is to speed up the data acquisition process, so that the motion effects would become negligible. This requirement cannot be met even by the most advanced conventional CT scanner today. The only scanner concept that delivers this king of speed is the Electron Beam CT (EBCT) which provides very poor reconstructed images. Moreover, the system and maintenance costs are very high to allow for commercial viability. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Medical Tomography Imaging;Adaptive Noise Cancellation;Spatial Overlap Correlator;Organ Motion Artifacts;Image Reconstruction Algorithms;X-Ray Scanners
Report Number
DCIEM-98-CR-52 — Contract Report
Date of publication
01 Oct 1998
Number of Pages
16
DSTKIM No
99-00208
CANDIS No
510036
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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