CURRENT US NAVY WELDING CONSUMABLES RESEARCH

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Authors
  1. Holsberg, P.W.
  2. DeLoach, J.J.
  3. Blackburn, J.M.
  4. Franke, G.L.
  5. Wong, R.J.
  6. DeNale, R.
Corporate Authors
Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis MD (US) Carderock Div;Defence Research Establishment Atlantic, Dartmouth NS (CAN)
Abstract
The affordable construction of U.S. Naval Ships is dependent on the ability to weld high strength steels using the most desirable process for a specific application. Typically, construction of ships includes gas metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, and shielded metal arc welding. While the use of the HY series of base materials and consumables have served the U.S. Navy well, the impetus towards more affordable, highly weldable steels is a major thrust of ships to be fabricated in the 1990's and beyond. The development of high strength, high toughness steel welding consumables, the understanding of the introdution and role that hydrogen plays in the establishment of multipass gas metal arc welding procedures in these high strength steel weld metals and modeling of weld metal microstructure of gas metal arc welds which incorporates multiple thermal cycles and different peak temperatures will be discussed. The effects of Ti content between 0 and 250 ppm on the strength and impact toughness are described for SMAW. The effects of MnO content in teh flux will be discussed in relation to the amount of Mn transferred to the weld metal and the effect on weld metal strength and impact toughness. Ultra low carbon bainitic weld metals produced by GTAW and GMAW and the resulting differences will be addressed. The development of a multipass weldability test and comparison to single pass WIC test will be discussed. TRUNCATED
Report Number
DREA-NAMT-95-3-PAP-4 — CONTAINED IN 99-00779
Date of publication
30 May 1995
Number of Pages
29
DSTKIM No
99-00794
CANDIS No
510358
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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