PRESERVATION AND PAINTING - MEETING THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE

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Authors
  1. Allison, D.M.
Corporate Authors
Ministry of Defence, London (England) Procurement Executive;Defence Research Establishment Atlantic, Dartmouth NS (CAN)
Abstract
The twin objective of reducing Unit Production Cost (UPC) and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) are of long standing within the Ministry of Defence (MOD). The reduction of LCCs has assumed particular importance within the Royal Navy as it is intertwined with the need to reduce the maintenance effort rquired from ships' companies and to increase availability. Thus, in the field of preservation and painting improved and longer lasting coatings are constantly sought. Some of these coatings primarily provide protection against corrosion while others provide operational attributes eg anti-fouling or no-skid properties. The technological challenges have been increased by the increasing requirements of environmental and occupational hygiene legislation. The Ministry of Defence is, of course, committed to the protection of the environment and of its workforce. This paper wil only address occupational hygiene matters where they coincide with environmental issues. Taking a positive approach, the challenge has also presented the opportunity to increase the pace of modernisation in products. MOD's role has been 'roactive' as MOD is, arguably, the major shipowner having painting undertaken in the UK, and is especially affected by the impact of environmental legislation on the painting process.
Report Number
DREA-NAMT-95-4-PAP-6 — CONTAINED IN 99-00779
Date of publication
30 May 1995
Number of Pages
19
DSTKIM No
99-00800
CANDIS No
510364
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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