GUIDELINES FOR EVALUATION OF CANADIAN FORCES INDOOR FIRING RANGES

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Authors
  1. Severs, Y.D.
  2. Sabiston, B.H.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Indoor Firing Range (IFR) within DND are typically used by Canadian Forces (CF) personnel, Cadets, RCMP, and civilian organizations for firing small bore weapons in support of both operational/occupational and recreational requirements. As indoor ranges are an enclosed space, environmental control measures must be in place to ensure that contaminants generated during weapons' firing are kept within acceptable exposure limits. (1) The contaminant of most concern when firing a weapon in an enclosed space is lead. During firing, the primer compound in a round ignites and vaporizes, causing the round to propel through the barrel. The hot combustion gases produced, cuase vaporization of the lead at the base of th eprojectile and additional lead is physically chaffed off as the round passes down the barrel. Further lead is released into the atmosphere during fragmentation and splattering of the lead round as it strikes the backstop; (2) All of these mechanisms contribute to the presence of airborne lead and exposure. Lead is not the only contaminant found during weapons' firing. Smaller quantities of Carbon Monoxide (CO), Sulfur Dioxide (SO2), Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and Ammonia (NH3) are also generated; (3) but it is the presence of inorganic aerosolized lead which causes the major respiratory health concern. TRUNCATED
Keywords
IFR (Indoor Firing Range);Industrial Hygiene techniques;Industrial Hygiene assessment;Oppupational Health assessment;Monitoring
Report Number
DCIEM-TM-1999-003 — Technical Memorandum
Date of publication
01 Jan 1999
Number of Pages
26
DSTKIM No
99-00454
CANDIS No
510506
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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