Importance of the Vestibular System in Visually Induced Nausea and Self-Vection

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Authors
  1. Johnson, W.H.
  2. Sunahara, F.A.
  3. Landolt, J.P.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
It has been well established that nodding head movements concomitant with body rotation around the vertical axis results in intense stimulation of the vestibular receptors of the inner ear (Coriolis effects), thereby readily inducing motion sickness through appropriate CNS connections [3.5]. Although it is known that motion sickness can also be induced when the stationary subject nods his head while viewing a moving visual field which produces a sensation of self-motion (vections) in the opposite direction, the pseudo-Coriolis effect [1,2], the relative importance of the vestibular receptors in such circumstances is not fully understood. It was the object of this study to clarify this question by exposing both normal and labyrinthine defective subjects to pseudo-Coriolis stimulation and compare the sensory effects thereby produced.
Keywords
Inner ear;Labyrinth;Nausea;Vection;Visualvestibular interaction
Report Number
DCIEM-94-P-28 — Reprint
Date of publication
15 Aug 1994
Number of Pages
8
Reprinted from
Journal of Vestibular Research, Vol 9, 1999, p 83-87
DSTKIM No
99-01788
CANDIS No
511958
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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