Research challenges for the human in command

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Authors
  1. McCann, C.
  2. Pigeau, R.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
As the chapters in this book attest, command is a rich and intricate tapestry of concepts, skills, and behaviour, demanding that military personnel of all ranks invent novel solutions to unique problems, often under extremely stressful environmental, physical, and emotional conditions. Time and again, the authors in this book have intimated (and indeed often stated) that the human alone shoulders the responsibility for achieving the mission: it is the commander's duty to conceive new tactics, to negotiate with belligerents, to manage resources, to monitor morale, to decide, to motivate, to reflect, to act - in short, to creatively express his or her will in the accomplishment of the mission. Although technology - the modern siren that promises Western society speed, and force multiplication - can certainly facilitate command, technology can also hinder it. Technology can encourage unrealistic expectations, spawn unforeseen consequences, or simply fail to work. Effective command and control (C2) depends on human command, not technological control. As we stated in Chapter 1, "The Human in Command: A Brief Introduction," militaries routinely deal with the direst human conflicts. TRUNCATED
Keywords
Human intervention
Report Number
DCIEM-SL-2000-061 — Paper
Date of publication
01 Feb 2000
Number of Pages
26
DSTKIM No
CA011562
CANDIS No
515036
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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