Pulsed eddy current technology: Characterizing material loss with gap and lift-off variations

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Authors
  1. Giguère, S.
  2. Lepine, B.A.
  3. Dubois, J.M.S.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Ownership costs of operational aircraft have increased steadily over the years. One of the major cost drivers is structural deterioration due to corrosion. Beyond the economics, finding and characterizing corrosion is essential for the continued airwothiness of aircraft fleets. To this end, the pulsed eddy current technique holds the potential of becoming the primary means of detecting corrosion in multilayered structures. Its wide-band frequency spectrum allows the determination of a large number of parameters, such as defect size and location. Pulsed eddy current is still considered an experimental nondestructive technique because of realistic inspection problems (e.g., probe tilting, protusion of rivets, and thickness variations in adhesive and paint) have not been addressed in the past. Recent advances change this situation and allow pulsed eddy current to be a credible field technique.
Keywords
Multi-layer structures;Pulsed eddy current
Report Number
DCIEM-SL-2000-115 — Scientific Literature
Date of publication
01 Jun 2001
Number of Pages
14
Reprinted from
Res Nondestr Eval, vol 13, 2001, p 119-129
DSTKIM No
CA020596
CANDIS No
517309
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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