Physiological limitation to emergency swimming in cold water

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Authors
  1. Kenny, G.P.
  2. Reardon, F.D.
  3. Ducharme, M.B.
  4. Oksa, J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN);Ottawa Univ, Ottawa ONT (CAN) School of Human Kinetics;Oulu Regional Inst of Occupational Health, Oulu (Finland)
Abstract
Swimming in cold water has been reported to accelerate the decreae of core temperature when compared to rates of cooling observed during static immersion. (Dobt, 1991; Hayward et al., 1975; Keatinge, 1960, 1961, 1969; Nadel et al., 1974; Sawaga, 1988). Several factors are known to modify the rate of decrease in core temperature during swimming in cold water, namely the water temperature, convective flow of the water, physical conditioning of the subject, adiposity, type of clothing worn and the intensity of the exercise (Golden and Tipton, 1987). These factors all impact the relative rate of heat production and loss. Others (Nadel et al., 1974) have reported that the overall hypothermia and cardio-respiratory distress are less important factors in limiting swimming in 18C water than the inability to contract skeletal muscle and muscle fatigue. This is particularly true of primary muscle groups and those of smaller mass (Doubt, 1991; Golden and Tipton, 1987).
Keywords
Cold water immersion;Self-rescue;Swimming failure
Report Number
DCIEM-CR-2001-026 — Contract Report
Date of publication
01 Jan 2001
Number of Pages
91
DSTKIM No
CA020610
CANDIS No
517316
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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