Adaptive Decision Processes in Perceptual Comparisons: Effects of Changes in the Global Difficulty Context

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Authors
  1. Baranski, J.V.
  2. Petrusic, W.M.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Adaptive decision processes were investigated in expeirments involving an unexpected change in the global ease or difficulty of the task. Under accuracy stress, a shift from an easy to a difficult context induced a marked increase in decision time, but a shift from a difficult to an easy context did not. Under speed stress, a shift to a more difficult context induced lower accuracy and rated confiderence, depending on the difficulty of the decision. A veiw of caution developed in D. Vickers's (1979) accumuator theory - whereby one seeks to base decision on more information - is compared with a view based on slow and fast guessing theory (W.M. Petrusic, 1992; W.M. Petruic & J.V. Baranski, 1989a) - whereby one seeks to base decision on more diagnosic information. On balance, the findings support the latter view.
Report Number
DCIEM-SL-1999-076 — Scientific Literature
Date of publication
30 Jul 1999
Number of Pages
18
Reprinted from
Journal of Experimental Psychology Human Perception and Performance, no 3, vol 29, 2003, p 658-674
DSTKIM No
CA022862
CANDIS No
519885
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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