Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Defence Against Influenza Viruses Using Nucleic Acid-Based Immunomodulators

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Authors
  1. Christopher, M.E.
  2. Wong, J.P.
Corporate Authors
Defence R&D Canada - Suffield, Ralston ALTA (CAN)
Abstract
The immune system, encompassing both specific (adaptive) and non-specific (innate) responses, is a powerful tool in the prevention and amelioration of infectious diseases. Vaccines have been used since Edward Jenner discovered the smallpox vaccine in the late 1700's and are effective in generating specific immune responses. However, if the etiological agent of an infectious disease undergoes a mutation it could lead to circumvention of specific immune responses. In these situations, or in cases where the etiological agent is unknown, augmentation of the innate immune response may be an effective alternative for disease amelioration. Non-specific immune responses can be induced by molecules which bind to toll-like receptors (TLRs) including double-stranded RNAs such as poly (ICLC), or oligonucleotides containing unmethylated deoxycytidyldeoxyguanosine (CpG) motifs. Both induce a variety of cytokines and can provide protection against various bacterial and viral pathogens, including influenza.
Keywords
Influenza;Pandemic
Date of publication
01 Jan 2005
Number of Pages
34
Reprinted from
Recent Developments on the Avian Fluenza (H5N1) Crisis, 2006, p 85-118
DSTKIM No
CA028705
CANDIS No
526789
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Document Image stored on Optical Disk

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