Fatigue, Sleep Loss, and Confidence in Judgment

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Authors
  1. Baranski, J.V.
Corporate Authors
Defence R&D Canada - Toronto, Toronto ONT (CAN)
Abstract
This study examined the accuracy of meta-cognitive judgments during 28-hours of sleep deprivation (SD) and continuous cognitive work. Three tasks were studied (perceptual comparison, general knowledge, and mental addition), collectively spanning a range of fundamental cognitive abilities and susceptibility to SD. Across all tasks, traditional indices of the confidence-accuracy relation (i.e., calibration, resolution, over/underconfidence), as well as the accuracy of task-level estimates, were unaffected by SD. The findings suggest that people can accurately assess their own cognitive performance when deprived of one-night of sleep and that this ability need not be based on subjective estimates of fatigue and sleepiness. They also highlight a dissociation in susceptibility to SD between a working memory task and a meta-cognitive “executive function”, both ostensibly under control of the pre-frontal cortex.

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Keywords
Sleep Deprivation, Fatigue, Cognitive Performance, Confidence, Calibration, Meta
Report Number
DRDC-TORONTO-SL-2005-234 — Scientific Literature
Date of publication
13 Sep 2005
Number of Pages
15
DSTKIM No
CA030829
CANDIS No
529518
Format(s):
Electronic Document(PDF)

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