Bush v. Bin Laden – Effect of State Emotion on Perceived Threat is Mediated by Emotion towards the Threat Agent

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Authors
  1. Mandel, D.R.
  2. Vartanian, O.
Corporate Authors
Defence R&D Canada - Toronto, Toronto ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The authors conducted an experiment to examine the effect of specific (fear and anger) and global emotional states on perceptions of threat posed by either George W. Bush or Osama Bin Laden. Findings revealed a case of moderated mediation: For participants who evaluated Bush, negative state emotion directly predicted perceived threat and was fully mediated by negative emotion evoked by Bush. For participants who evaluated Bin Laden, however, negative state emotion did not predict perceived threat. The authors discuss implications of the findings for theories that postulate an effect of emotion on risk perceptions and for understanding threat perception in the terrorism context.

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Keywords
Threat perception;Anger;Osama Bin Laden;George W. Bush;Psychosocial factors;Valence-based;Emotion-specific;Dread;Outrage
Report Number
DRDC-TORONTO-SL-2009-015 — Scientific Literature
Date of publication
01 Jul 2009
Number of Pages
22
DSTKIM No
CA034546
CANDIS No
534100
Format(s):
Electronic Document(PDF)

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