A Review of Social Science Literature on Social Identity Dynamics and Scientific Fundamentalism

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Authors
  1. Cheung, I.
  2. DeWit, Y.
  3. Filardo, E-A.
  4. Thomson, M.H.
  5. Adams, B.D.
Corporate Authors
Defence R&D Canada - Toronto, Toronto ONT (CAN);Humansystems Inc, Guelph ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The main purpose of the Human Terrain Visualization and Simulation (HTVis) project is to develop computer tools that can help Canadian decision makers envision and simulate aspects of human terrain. The present report reviews literature from Social Identity Theory (SIT; Tajfel and Turner, 1979) to help the development of such computer tools for use in Canadian Forces (CF) training initiatives. This review was guided by three primary questions: 1) How do sociostructural beliefs influence social identity management strategies for high and low status groups? 2) How do sociostructural beliefs influence intergroup perceptions? 3) How do social identity management strategies influence intergroup perceptions? The papers reviewed show that beliefs about sociostructural variables (i.e., perceptions of status stability, legitimacy, and permeability) can influence identity management strategies (i.e., social competition, individual mobility, or social creativity). Research suggests that, even though high and low status groups may have different motivations, they may use similar or different strategies. But this is often dependent on the level of identification with the ingroup and their perceptions of the sociostructural context. Results of the literature review also showed some research examining the impact of sociostructural beliefs on intergroup perceptions. There is very little research that addresses the impact of identity management strategies on intergroup perceptions. However, t

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Keywords
social identity;human terrain;socio-cultural modeling
Report Number
DRDC-TORONTO-CR-2012-077 — Contractor Report
Date of publication
01 Mar 2012
Number of Pages
154
DSTKIM No
CA037095
CANDIS No
536785
Format(s):
Electronic Document(PDF)

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