SEASICKNESS IN OCCUPANTS OF TOTALLY-ENCLOSED MOTOR-PROPELLED SURVIVAL CRAFT (TEMPSC)

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Authors
  1. Landolt, J.P.
  2. Monaco, C.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Seasickness occurs in 75% or more of occupants in totally-enclosed motor-propelled survival craft (TEMPSC). It has occurred in oil rig abandonments in relatively calm waters of wave height 1 m (Ocean Odyssey incident) and in severe seas of 15 m heights (Rowan Gorilla I). There are a number of neurosensory mismatches that contribute to seasickness in TEMPSC evacuees, including: (1) the small confined space, with poor external visual reference; (2) occupants are passive passengers not in control of their own movements; (3) seating arrangements that face in a variety of directions; (4) poor head support, which leads to excessive head movements; and (5) occupants sit upright rather than take a recombent position, which is known to reduce seasickness. The most effective way of controlling vomiting for seasickness is through the use of antimotion sickness drugs. TRUNCATED
Report Number
DCIEM-89-RR-14 — Technical Report (Final)
Date of publication
15 Apr 1989
Number of Pages
88
DSTKIM No
89-02612
CANDIS No
60517
Format(s):
Document Image stored on Optical Disk;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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